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Travel Clinic

Travel Clinic

We offer a comprehensive range of vaccines and antimalarials for adults and children aged 12 years and older.

Book a time and date in advance. Note that some medication will require a few sessions before you travel so it is advisable to book in advance. No matter what the destination, we are here to help.

Vaccinations we can help with...

You can open up and view detailed information on each condition which contains advice on prevention, signs and symptoms, countries at risk and travel precautions.

Prevention

Cholera is vaccine-preventable, with the vaccine offering 85-90% protection against Cholera for a 2-year period. Travellers to high-risk areas may be recommended a course of two tablets, which is administered orally.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms can appear between 1-5 days after ingesting the bacteria. Sufferers can experience vomiting of a clear liquid, and painless diarrhoea, which is pale and cloudy in appearance. These symptoms can expel a massive amount of fluid from the body, resulting in dehydration and causing the skin to turn a greyish blue colour.

Countries at risk

Cholera is particularly prevalent in Central and South America, Africa, and Asia (see South East, East and Central)

Cholera occurs in areas of poor sanitation, with poor water and food hygiene, particularly in areas suffering from natural disasters or war zones.

Travel Precautions

While you are travelling, only drink water from a sealed bottle or from sources that have been treated by filtration, tablets or boiling. Avoid ice from unknown water sources. Avoid uncooked food and only eat fruit that you can peel. Ensure that hot food is freshly cooked and served hot. Use common sense concerning personal hygiene and hand washing.

Prevention

Diphtheria is an infectious disease affecting the upper respiratory tract and is caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae or ulcerans. Diphtheria is preventable disease with a simple Diphtheria vaccine. Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended a single course injection to cover against Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio.

Tetanus is a bacterial infection that is usually introduced into the body through a puncture wound. The disease causes severe muscle spasms and is often fatal. Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended a single injection, which also covers against Diphtheria and Polio.

Polio (Poliomyelitis) is a highly contagious acute viral infection which may cause permanent nerve damage, leading to paralysis of limbs and respiratory muscles. is particularly dangerous to children. There is no cure for Polio; it can only be prevented against. Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended a single injection, which also covers against Diphtheria and Polio.

Signs and Symptoms

Diphtheria attacks the respiratory system and sufferers may complain of difficulty in breathing or swallowing, sore throats, headaches, chills, fever, a heavy cough, bluish skin colouration, rapid and/or shallow breathing.

The earliest symptom of Tetanus is lockjaw, a severe stiffness in the mandibular muscles which makes it very difficult to open your mouth. This stiffness, which is often accompanied by spasms, spreads to the neck and limbs over the following period of up to three days. It can become difficult to swallow, with severe cases causing difficulty in breathing, which can lead to suffocation. Other symptoms include a high fever, high blood pressure, rapid heartbeat and heavy sweating.

Polio is highly infectious, but symptoms do not typically appear for up to 20 days. Early symptoms include fever, headaches, vomiting, fatigue, chest pains, and stiffness in the neck. In rare cases (1 in 200), the sufferer can be permanently paralysed, usually in the legs. Among these rare cases, 5-10% can be killed when their breathing muscles become immobilised.

Countries at risk

Cases of Diphtheria are most frequently reported in India, Indonesia, China, Papua New Guinea, Russia, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and several countries in Central and South America.

The Tetanus bacteria can be found in many areas of the world, and is particularly prevalent in China, India, throughout Africa, and in certain South American countries including Peru, Colombia and Ecuador.

Polio is widespread throughout Central Africa and in certain areas of Asia (see South East, East and Central). The only three countries that remain Polio-endemic are Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Travel Precautions

Diphtheria can affect all travellers who have not had the Diphtheria vaccine, so the most important precaution to take is to ensure that all travellers are vaccinated

Tetanus is the only vaccine-preventable disease that is infectious but not contagious. As the disease is contracted through puncture wounds, burns and intravenous drug use. If you receive any injuries on your travels, be sure to seek medical attention – even if the wound doesn’t seem too bad, you may run the risk of contracting Tetanus.

For Polio, poor sanitation is a huge factor in the spread of the disease, which is highly contagious and is spread by ingesting contaminated food and water. While you are travelling, only drink water from a sealed bottle or from sources that have been treated by filtration, tablets or boiling. Avoid ice from unknown water sources. Avoid uncooked food and only eat fruit that you can peel. Ensure that hot food is freshly cooked and served hot. Use common sense concerning personal hygiene and hand washing.

Prevention

Hepatitis A is a viral infection spread through contaminated food and water, which causes inflammation of the liver. Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended one of the following vaccination courses:

A single course injection to cover against Hepatitis A

A course of three injections to cover against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B

A single dose to cover against Hepatitis A and Typhoid fever

A single injection followed by a booster can provide long-term protection.

Ideally, travellers need to be vaccinated at least two weeks before travel. The initial injection will offer short-term protection for a single trip, while a booster will provide long-term cover and should preferably be taken within 6-12 months of the first vaccine.

Signs and Symptoms

It can take up to two weeks for any signs or symptoms develop and the severity of the virus ranges; in young children, infection may show mild or no symptoms, but it can be a serious illness in older people. Common signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A include: fever, muscular aches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, weight loss, abdominal pain and yellow discolouration of the skin and eyes.

Countries at risk

Hepatitis A occurs worldwide but is most commonly found in parts of Africa, Asia (see Central, South East and East), Central and South America, and it is most prevalent in areas with poor sanitation.

Travel Precautions

When travelling only drink water either from a sealed bottle or a source that you are sure has been treated by filtration tablets or boiling. Avoid ice from unknown water sources. Avoid uncooked food and only eat fruit that can be peeled. Ensure that food is freshly cooked and served hot. Use common sense around personal hygiene and hand washing.

Prevention

Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease. Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended one of the following vaccination courses:

A course of three injections to cover against Hepatitis B

A course of three injections to cover against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B

The vaccine is a course of three injections, which are given rapidly over a one month course or over a standard six month course.

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that is spread through infected blood or bodily fluids. It can lead to severe liver problems and is often fatal.

Signs and Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of Hepatitis B include mild fever, flu-like symptoms, high temperature, gastro-intestinal upset, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain, yellow skin and eyes.

Countries at risk

Areas where there is a higher risk of exposure to hepatitis B include Eastern Europe, Russia, India, China, South and Central America, Africa, South East Asia and many islands in the South Pacific although Hepatitis B occurs worldwide.

Travel Precautions

Any activity causing contact with blood or body fluids can put you at risk.

Travellers may also be exposed when receiving medical or dental treatment while abroad. Infection can be spread via sexual intercourse, needle sharing, blood transfusions and injections, as well as through tattooing, body piercing and acupuncture.

Prevention

HPV stands for human papillomavirus and is the name of a very common group of viruses. There are over 100 types of HPV viruses and about 40 infect the genital tract and are linked to cancer.

HPV is passed on from one person to another through intimate sexual contact with an infected individual, usually without the person ever knowing it. The virus enters the body through tiny breaks in the skin.

There is no treatment for HPV itself, but conditions it causes can be treated – for example, genital warts, cell changes (abnormal cells), or cervical cancer.

The HPV vaccine protects against the types of HPV that cause most cases of genital warts & cervical cancer, as well as some other cancers that affect the mouth, throat, vagina, penis and anus. It does not protect against all types of HPV.

Condoms offer some but not total protection from HPV, as they don’t cover all of the genital skin.

Getting protected can also prevent infected women passing it onto their newborn babies.

Signs and Symptoms

High-risk HPV has no symptoms. This may be concerning, but if you go for cervical screening (a smear test) when invited, it can detect high-risk HPV virus and changes early, before it develops into cancer.

Low risk HPV can lead to genital warts. Whilst these strains are not linked to cancers, genital warts can be unpleasant and may require medical treatment.

Countries at risk

HPV is prevalent all over the world, and the fact that it is passed through intimate genital-skin contact, can lie undetected and has no specific symptoms, means it is highly contagious. The HPV virus is so common that 4 out of 5 of us may get a type of HPV virus at some point in our lives.

Travel Precautions

You cannot fully protect yourself against HPV, but there are things that can help:

The HPV vaccine is highly effective & protects up to 9 types of HPV (types 6, 11, 16 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 & 58) that cause over 70% of cervical cancers, most HPV related penile cancers, a significant proportion of anal cancers and 90% of genital warts.

Condoms can help protect you against HPV, but as HPV lives on the skin in and around the whole genital area, they do not cover all the genitals so do not completely get rid of the risk.

Prevention

Two injections may be recommended for travellers considering outdoor activities in high-risk areas, especially during the transmission season. The Japanese Encephalitis vaccination is a course of two vaccines over 28 days.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms usually occur 5 to 15 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Initially, a flu-like illness may occur, which may progress to brain swelling, resulting in symptoms such as high fever, confusion, convulsions, headache, neck stiffness and paralysis. Japanese Encephalitis can result in death or permanent brain damage and disability.

Countries at risk

Japanese Encephalitis occurs in most countries in Asia (see South East, East and Central), the Indian subcontinent and remote parts of northeast Australia.

Travel Precautions

While travelling, be sure to use mosquito nets and avoid insect bites between dusk and dawn when the mosquitos are most active. Covering the skin in insect repellent is also a good precaution.

Prevention

The Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine offers immunity against all three of these diseases. A full course of the MMR vaccination requires two doses, with at least four weeks between each dose. Adults and older children who did not receive MMR as part of the childhood vaccination programme can still be vaccinated at any age.

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness, spread by air borne transmission which is easily passed on from person to person. In some cases, it can be fatal or resulting in very serious life-long complications.

Mumps is a contagious viral infection, causing swelling and inflammation of one or both of the parotid glands. Mumps is transmitted by sneezing, coughing or direct contact with respiratory secretions. Mumps can affect the nervous system. Complications can include pancreatitis, oophoritis, orchitis, deafness and infertility besides neurological complications from meningitis.

Rubella is also known as German measles spreads through the air and causes a spotty rash to develop. It usually takes around one week for the symptoms of Rubella to clear. If a non-immune pregnant lady gets rubella it can cause severe complications such as heart problems, deafness, small under-developed brains, lesions on the brain, liver, lungs and in bone marrow.

Signs and Symptoms

It takes around 10 days after infection for symptoms of Measles to develop, and these may include:

  • Cold like symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing and a cough
  • High temperature or fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Sore, red, watery, inflamed eyes that may be sensitive to light
  • Loss of appetite
  • Tiredness, irritability and general lack of energy
  • Small, greyish white spots in the mouth

2-4 days after these initial symptoms, a red-brown blotchy rash typically appears, which usually fades after about a week.

Mumps is particularly distinctive in appearance because of the painful swelling in the sides of the face and under the ears. This usually develops a few days after the initial symptoms, which include headaches, joint pain and a high temperature, malaise, anorexia, earache, neck pain and photophobia (sensitivity to light).

The primary symptom of Rubella is a red or pink spotty rash, which usually takes 2 to 3 weeks to appear after exposure to the virus. Additional symptoms include:

  • Aching fingers, wrists or knees
  • High temperature exceeding 38°C
  • A cough
  • Sneezing and a runny nose
  • Headaches
  • Sore throat
  • Red eyes
  • Malaise
  • Swollen glands

Countries at risk

Measles is prevalent all around the world and can be found in Asia, Africa, the Indian sub-continent and South America. Many developed countries have experienced outbreaks in recent years, including Australia, the US, Canada, New Zealand and numerous European countries, such as France, Germany and the UK.

Mumps is prevalent in much of Asia, Africa, the Indian sub-continent and South America. Many developed countries have experienced outbreaks of Mumps in recent years such as the US, Australia and several European countries, including Spain and the UK.

Rubella is prevalent in much of Asia, Africa, the Indian sub-continent and South America. More recently there have also been outbreaks of Rubella in Poland and Japan.

Travel Precautions

The risk of infection from Measles increases when living or working with non-immune local people or if you attend a large gathering, for instance a sporting event or music festival, due to the highly contagious nature of the virus. The best way to protect yourself is to ensure you have received the MMR vaccine preferably a month before travelling.

The best way to protect yourself from Mumps and Rubella when travelling is to ensure you have had two doses of the MMR vaccine preferably a month before setting off. You should also practice good hygiene and cleanliness, which involves:

  • Washing your hands regularly
  • Using hand sanitiser
  • Only touching your face if your hands are clean
  • Covering your mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are ill

Prevention

Meningitis is a medical emergency requiring urgent hospital treatment, as blood poisoning can develop rapidly. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics. It is always preferable to take measures to prevent the disease rather than treat it after the fact.

Travellers to areas of risk may be recommended a single dose injection to vaccinate against Meningitis ACWY. All travellers who are vaccinated against Meningitis ACWY will also receive a certificate.

All Hajj and Umrah pilgrims are required to show certification of vaccination on arrival in Saudi Arabia.

Meningitis (Meningococcal Meningitis) is a serious, potentially fatal, bacterial infection that causes swelling of the lining of the brain and spinal cord, and blood poisoning. It can result in permanent disability and death, particularly if blood poisoning occurs.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms can appear suddenly and include severe headache, fever, cold hands and feet, vomiting, muscle and joint pain, stiffness of the neck, sensitivity to bright light, sleepiness, confusion, seizures and loss of consciousness.

Babies, children and adolescents are particularly at risk. Symptoms may be hard to identify in babies and young children, who may exhibit the following signs: refusing feeds, unusual crying or moaning, irritability, listlessness, unresponsiveness, jerky movements or becoming stiff or floppy and very rapid breathing.

Blood poisoning caused by Meningitis can cause a red, purplish rash that does not fade when pressure is applied.

Countries at risk

Meningitis occurs worldwide, but particularly in the Meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa.

Prevention

A course of three injections of the vaccine will cover against Rabies and is recommended for travellers to high-risk areas who may be exposed to Rabies because of their chosen travel activities and/or limited access to post-exposure medical care.

In the event of possible exposure to Rabies, urgent medical attention should be sought, even in those who have received pre-exposure vaccines.

Rabies is a fatal viral infection that is spread from animals to humans which causes acute inflammation of the spinal cord and brain.

Signs and Symptoms

The first symptoms of Rabies are usually similar to the flu, including fever and headaches. There may also be pain at the area of the bite, developing within days, to symptoms of anxiety, confusion and agitation. As the disease progresses further, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behaviour, hallucinations, and insomnia.

Countries at risk

Rabies occurs worldwide. Over 15 million people are exposed to potentially rabid animals annually with approximately 40,000 to 70,000 deaths every year. Low-risk areas include mainland Europe and the UK, Australia, North America and Japan; travelling almost anywhere else in the world carries some level of risk of exposure to Rabies.

Travel Precautions

Infected mammals can spread the Rabies virus through bites, scratches or even a lick onto broken skin. Travellers are advised to avoid contact with animals in high-risk areas. All mammals are susceptible to the virus, including skunks, jackals, mongooses, foxes, raccoons, dogs, cats, monkeys and bats.

Dogs account for the majority of human deaths, with most of these occurring in South East, East and Central Asia, Africa, and the Indian subcontinent. Bats cause most human Rabies deaths in the USA and Canada, and have recently begun to emerge as a health threat in Western Europe, South and Central America and Australia.

Prevention

Travellers may be recommended a course of two vaccines administered 2 weeks apart. For extended protection, a booster at 5 months is recommended. (3 doses in total)

Ticks are frequently found on protruding branches of trees and bushes, so walkers should stick to the centre of trails to avoid coming into contact with them. Avoid drinking unpasteurised milk in areas at risk.

Tick-borne Encephalitis is a viral disease that is spread by infected ticks. Encephalitis is often linked with Meningitis, as the virus can attack both the brain and the meninges..

Signs and Symptoms

The initial symptoms of Tick-borne Encephalitis usually occur one to two weeks after a tick bite and include fever, headache and general flu-like illness. Sufferers may also complain of nausea, muscle pain, lethargy and general discomfort. Some patients may go on to develop Encephalitis, which can cause paralysis and can be fatal in some cases.

Countries at risk

Tick-borne Encephalitis is usually found in Central and Eastern Europe, in countries such as Poland, Romania, Lithuania, some parts of Scandinavia, and throughout Russia.

Travel Precautions

Insect bite avoidance methods should be taken, such as wearing protective clothing and using insect repellent.

Prevention

Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended one of the following vaccines:

A single dose injection

3 capsules to be administered orally

A single dose injection of Hepatitis A & Typhoid combined

It is also advised that travellers take appropriate precautions with food and water.

Typhoid Fever is a bacterial infection that is spread through contaminated food and water. It can cause intestinal bleeding, toxic heart disease, pneumonia, seizures and swelling of the brain.

Signs and Symptoms

Signs and symptoms may include mild fever and headache, muscle aches, chills, nausea, and loss of appetite. Some sufferers report abdominal discomfort, constipation and/or diarrhoea.

Countries at risk

The disease is widespread in much of the world, including South Asia and parts of South-East Asia, the Middle East, Central and South America, and Africa. Outbreaks of Typhoid have also been reported from countries in Eastern Europe including Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Russia.

Travel Precautions

Typhoid fever is mostly found in areas where standards of personal and food hygiene are low, and sanitation is lacking. While travelling, only drink water from a sealed bottle or water that has been treated using a quality filter, tablets or boiling. Avoid ice from an unknown water source. Avoid uncooked food and only eat fruit that you can peel. Ensure that hot food is freshly cooked and served hot. Use common sense around personal hygiene and hand washing.

Prevention

You may be recommended to take anti-malarial tablets to prevent you from becoming infected if you are travelling to an area with a risk of Malaria. Be sure to also use repellent and mosquito nets to increase your level of safety. There are a range of different anti-malarial tablets that will be prescribed to travellers based on several factors, including: destination, medical history, family history, current medications, previous problems with anti-malarial tablets, age and pregnancy.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms of Malaria include shivering, fever, joint pain, vomiting, jaundice and convulsions. The classic symptom of Malaria is a sudden coldness followed by fever and sweating.

In severe cases, Malaria can progress extremely rapidly, induce a coma and even death within hours or days.

Young children and pregnant women are especially vulnerable to the disease.

Countries at risk

Malaria is a large worldwide problem.

Travel Precautions

Many cases of malaria can be prevented by the ABCD approach:

  • Awareness of risk: know your risk of malaria.
  • Bite prevention: avoid bites as much as possible.
  • Chemoprophylaxis: take the right anti-malarial tablets.
  • Diagnosis: get immediate medical help for symptoms.

Prevention

There is no cure for Polio; it can only be prevented against. In the UK the Tetanus, Diphtheria & Polio vaccine (Td/IPV) is part of the childhood immunisation schedule. Travellers to areas at risk may be recommended a single injection.

Polio (Poliomyelitis) is a potentially life-threatening acute viral infection. It is a highly contagious disease which may cause permanent nerve damage, leading to paralysis of limbs and respiratory muscles.

Signs and Symptoms

Polio is highly infectious, but symptoms do not typically appear for up to 20 days. Early symptoms include fever, headaches, vomiting, fatigue, chest pains, and stiffness in the neck. In rare cases (1 in 200), the sufferer can be permanently paralysed, usually in the legs. Among these rare cases, 5-10% can be killed when their breathing muscles become immobilised.

Countries at risk

Polio is widespread throughout Central Africa and in certain areas of Asia (see South East, East and Central). The only three countries that remain Polio-endemic are Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Travel Precautions

Poor sanitation is a huge factor in the spread of the disease, which is highly contagious and is spread by ingesting contaminated food and water. While you are travelling, only drink water from a sealed bottle or from sources that have been treated by filtration, tablets or boiling. Avoid ice from unknown water sources. Avoid uncooked food and only eat fruit that you can peel. Ensure that hot food is freshly cooked and served hot. Use common sense concerning personal hygiene and hand washing.

Prevention

Most adults would have had Chicken Poxit in childhood and are therefore immune to chickenpox, as it is very unlikely you will become infected with the disease more than once. It can be vaccinated against, requiring 2 doses to be taken 6 weeks apart, which will come into effect approximately 4-8 weeks after the 2nd dose has been administered.

The 2nd dose vaccine is highly effective in children and can be given from 1 year of age. Vaccination or previous chicken pox illness stops the need for an immunoglobulin in high risk groups if exposed.

Chickenpox (known medically as varicella) is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus called the varicella-zoster virus. It’s spread quickly and easily from someone who is infected. Chickenpox is an airborne disease which spreads easily through the coughs and sneezes of an infected person.

Complications may occasionally include pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, and bacterial skin infections. The disease is often more severe in adults than in children particularly pregnant women & those who smoke. Symptoms begin 10 to 21 days after exposure to the virus.

The chicken pox virus is also linked to Shingles where the elderly are more at risk. For babies and those that immunosuppressed bleeding complications are greatly increased.

Signs and Symptoms

1 to 3 weeks after exposure to the chickenpox virus red spots begin to appear on the body. These will start to blister as they fill with fluid, sometimes bursting or spreading to other areas. Eventually they will crust over and turn to scabs, clearing up after around 5 days. However, the symptoms are not limited to the chickenpox rash, as sufferers may also experience sickness, aches and pains throughout the body, headaches, body temperatures exceeding 38°C and a lack of appetite.

Countries at risk

Chickenpox is prevalent all over the world, and the fact that it is highly contagious means that anyone who is unvaccinated and exposed to the disease is almost certain to become infected.

Prevention

The flu virus can survive for up to 24 hours. Anyone who breathes in the droplets or touch the surfaces that the droplets have landed on can catch the virus.

The flu jab is the best form of defence against catching flu and developing serious complications. This is available from the NHS for primary aged children and certain groups of adults, while private clinics also offer vaccinations. It is important to be vaccinated yearly, as the viruses which cause flu change every year, meaning there is a different vaccine from winter to winter.

Good hygiene is also key so regular hand washing & cleaning of surfaces along with antiviral medication can help.

Flu, short for Influenza, is a common infectious viral illness spread by coughs and sneezes.

The flu virus is contained in the millions of tiny droplets that come out of the nose and mouth when someone who is infected coughs or sneezes.

If you are generally healthy it usually clears up within a week, however it can be extremely serious for anyone with underlying health conditions, resulting in severe illness or even death.

Signs and Symptoms

Symptoms of flu can range from mild to severe. Some of the main flu symptoms include:

High temperature, tiredness & weakness, runny nose, sore throat, aching muscles & joints, headache, coughing & sneezing.

Countries at risk

Flu, or Influenza is common all over the world, and is highly contagious.

Travel Precautions

You cannot fully protect yourself against flu, but by adopting good hygiene measures, you can help stop yourself catching flu or spreading it to others.

Always wash your hands regularly with soap, especially after travelling on public transport.

Use tissues to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.

Put used tissues in a bin as soon as possible.

Avoid unnecessary contact with other people if you are infectious.

Prevention

Vaccinations can protect babies and children from the whooping cough, there are currently 3 vaccinations which protect them from the infection.

PREGNANCY

Whooping cough vaccines in pregnancy – is normally given after 20th week of pregnancy and protects your baby during the first few, precious weeks of their life.

BABIES

6 in 1 vaccine – given routinely to babies at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age

YOUNG CHILDREN

4 in 1 pre school booster – given to children at 3 years and 4 months of age

The vaccines protect infants and children from whooping cough in the early stages of their life, when they are particularly vulnerable & at high risk of infection, however, it does not offer lifelong protection.

Whooping Cough, also known as Pertussis, is a highly contagious infection of the respiratory system. It causes severe coughing bouts that can last for two to three months or more & young children in particular can become very ill, and in rare cases, even prove fatal.

Signs and Symptoms

The initial symptoms of whooping cough are similar to the common cold:

  • Runny nose
  • Red watery eyes
  • Sneezing
  • Sore throat
  • Mild cough
  • Raised temperature
  • Irritability
  • Intense coughing bouts start to develop around a week later.

During a coughing spell, the face may turn red and you or your child may gasp for breath – this may cause a ‘whoop’ sound when breathing in, although not everyone will develop this.

Coughing usually produces thick mucus and could also result in vomiting.

Infants and young children can also briefly turn blue (cyanosis) if they have trouble breathing.

Countries at risk

Whooping cough is common all over the world and is highly contagious.

Travel Precautions

Vaccines can protect babies & children from whooping cough in their vulnerable early years of life. Pockets of outbreaks can occur and some countries like Australia request evidence of a recent booster vaccine for adults visiting newly born babies.

Whooping cough is highly contagious and infectious from approx. 6 days after becoming infected until 3 weeks after the coughing bouts start. It is therefore recommended not to travel when you are infectious.

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